Searching for Ella Higginson

March 12 2015 7:00

Whatcom Museum Rotunda Room • 121 Prospect St. • Free

Join us for a fascinating talk about Ella Higginson with Laura Laffrado, professor of English at WWU. Laffrado will speak about her efforts to reintroduce readers to Higginson’s life and work and to reclaim Higginson as a significant voice in American literature. A new publication from the Whatcom County Historical Society on Higginson is due out soon. Laffrado is the author.

An Early Voice of the Pacific Northwest

The first prominent literary author from the Pacific Northwest, Ella Rhoads Higginson (1862?-1940) has been largely forgotten Higginson with Car 001as a key American writer. During the turn from the nineteenth century into the twentieth century, readers across the nation were introduced to the remote Pacific Northwest region by Higginson’s descriptions of majestic mountains, vast forests, and scenic waters, as well as the often difficult economic circumstances of those dwelling near Puget Sound. Higginson was celebrated for her award-winning fiction, her lyric poetry which was set to music and performed internationally, and her distinguished position as the first Poet Laureate of Washington State. Throughout her literary career, Higginson published hundreds of poems, stories, and essays in leading magazines and newspapers, while also writing books, including the novel Mariella, of Out-West (1902) and the nonfiction work Alaska, the Great Country (1908).

Lost to Time but Relevant Today as Precise Look at Our Region 100 years ago Continue reading

February’s Program: The Great Sedro-Woolley Bank Robbery of 1914

Join Speaker Rustan RobertsonSW Cover on the Great Robbery of 1914

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

Whatcom Museum Rotunda Room • 121 Prospect St. • Free

What’s It About

Oct. 17, 1914,  robbers struck a bank in Skagit County, but the deadly chase that followed reached into Whatcom County and lower British Columbia. The bandits’ identities were never confirmed, but it’s believed they were part of a gang that committed multiple robberies in Washington and Canada. They spoke a foreign language, possibly Russian.

Several sightings of the bandits were made in Ferndale and Blaine before the fiery ending of the story. About half of the $11,649 stolen was never recovered. The coins would be worth about $400,000 today. The robbery continues to be one of the most popular stories from early 20th century NW. Continue reading

First Program of the New Year 2015

Happy New Year!!

Here at the Whatcom County Historical Society, we all wish you the very best day and year to come. Please join us for our first presentation of 2015.

Incarceration of Japanese and Japanese Americans during World War II”

 

Bus for removal

Presented by Fumio Otsu and Carole Teshima

Thursday, January 8, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

Whatcom Museum Rotunda Room • 121 Prospect St. • Free

A Difficult Chapter in Our Nation’s History

More than 120,000 Japanese and Japanese American families were incarcerated in the United States during WWII. This presentation will give an overview of the incarceration on the West Coast and follow the experience of two families’ pre-WWII, during WWII and post WWII.

Pat Shima evacuation kidPresenter Fumio Otsu was born in the Tule Lake Concentration Camp where Japanese families from Bellingham were also imprisoned. The overview will include a timeline for the incarceration beginning with the evacuation order by President Roosevelt in 1942 to the formal apology by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. People of Japanese ancestry were incarcerated in 10 concentration camps and 29 prison locations. The post war impacts of their release will be discussed from the perspective of each of Otsu’s families. Teshima will present research on the established Bellingham families who were forcibly removed from their homes and businesses, gave up everything and never returned. Continue reading

The San Juan Islands: Into the 21st Century

Join us for a presentation by author JoAnn RoeJoAnn Roe

When: Thursday, April 11, 2013
Where: Whatcom Museum Rotunda Room 121 Prospect St.
Free and open to all

What’s it all about? The San Juan Islands

The 172 San Juan Islands of Washington State are the uppermost remains of a mountain range that once separated the fifty miles between Vancouver Island and mainland Washington. Its valleys today are saltwater channels and open waters that seamlessly melt into the Canadian Gulf Islands and the Inside Passage to Alaska. Some American Campforested mountains soar skyward to 2,409 feet with their bases plunging underwater to great depths. Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany negotiated a boundary agreement between Britain and the United States in 1872, after a period called the “Pig War,” about which much has been written.

From a fifty-year resident’s viewpoint, The San Juan Islands: Into the 21st Century examines this remote yet oft-visited northwest corner of Washington State. The author tells of farming IMG_0010lavender rather than wheat and alpacas rather than cattle; of inter-island boats and barges that still fight stormy seas and riptide; of the development of reliable medical care only during the 1950s; of the emphasis today on sensible land management, the orca whales that are native to the area, and the former and current island people.

JoAnn Roe explores both the history and the present of this unique and alluring region. Roe traces the challenging task IMG_0023of bringing electrical power to the islands by Opalco, a possible “first.”

Spring Sale

We’re having a Garage Sale to benefit the Territorial Courthouse on Saturday April 6th, 2013 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.  Donate your gently used clothing, art, toys, books, and household items at our pre-sale drop off times this Saturday March 30th from 10am-1pm and April 4th and 5th from 4pm-7pm.  Bring an item to donate (or just donate!) and we’ll give you a quick tour of the restoration work.  See you there!

History Holiday

Annual History Holiday

Open Mike Sharing and Annual Membership Meeting1850 Christmas

Thursday, December 13, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

Whatcom Museum Rotunda Room • 121 Prospect St. • Free • All Welcome

Join us for a festive and informative evening of open mike sharing and holiday goodies! All are welcome (members and non-members alike) to sign up for a 5-minute slot during which you may share anything that relates to local or regional history – a personal story, research items, an artifact, or anything else that comes to mind. We will also be passing out forms to collect ideas for the upcoming trivia night at the Whatcom Museum and gather ideas for other Historical Society projects.

The line up so far

Already lined up for a spot at the mike is Janet Oakley, who will be sharing about “Two gals and a Guy at Gettysburg: Making history while painting picket fences.” In September, along with Edradine and Harald Hovde participated in the Friends of Gettysburg work-vacation. Oakley went to honor her great-grandfather who was a Union surgeon at the battle. Hovde went to bring the story of George E Pickett on Bellingham Bay to the national park there. Hard work and high times ensued.

Vaughn Sherman is also lined up. Sherman is the author of “Sea Travels: Memoirs of a Twentieth Century Master Mariner – The story of J. Holger Christensen as told to his nephew Vaughn Sherman.” Sea Travels tracks two generations of the Christensen family from Puget Sound’s pioneer days, to the Alaskan Gold Rush and onto the world’s open oceans. Their saga includes hard times and history ― taking President Truman salmon fishing on Puget Sound and La Blanca’s dynamite-fueled explosion on a Tacoma shore, one of the most dramatic Puget Sound maritime episodes to this day ― as well as the high jinx and heroism of rootless and restless men of the sea. 

Members who have a project they’d like to share,  sign up before the program. There’s still room.

We will also get a sneak preview of the Society’s newest books and members at $25 and above can pick up their copy of Journal Twelve, hot off the press. A very brief election of board members will precede the program. See you there!

YOU CAN HELP

The courthouse has been restored, but our most pressing need is a handicap lift to install and future interpretation.  You can help in several ways.

For the lift, a donation as small as $10.00 could help. If we got a  1000 people to donate, we could match the money to get the lift purchased and the final installation.  Before the lift, we can’t have public programming.  And we want you to see the beautiful insides and plans we have for educational tours and school workshops.

You can also:

BUY A PRINT

First, by purchasing a print of the Ann Parry by well-known maritime artist Steve Mayo.  Based on research in local and national archives it details the Ann Parry unloading bricks.  Call Rick Tremaine to purchase at (360) 734- 7381

BUY A BRICK

Purchase brick to be placed on a future walk way on the side of the building. Remember a family member or a time in history with a simple inscription. Bricks are $50.00.  The back is all ready for installation once we get the lift.